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brianmichaelbendis:

USA Today has the first look at our kick ass cast for the live-action Powers TV show coming this winter to the PlayStation network
http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/tv/2014/09/16/powers-tv-exclusive-first-look/15712229/
Every PSN user in the US will receive the first episode of Powers for free and PlayStation Plus members will be able to view the entire season for free.
All volumes of the Eisner award-winning Powers series are available through Marvel/icon or digitally through comixology.  yum yum.
https://www.comixology.com/Powers-Vol-1/comics-series/4546

brianmichaelbendis:

USA Today has the first look at our kick ass cast for the live-action Powers TV show coming this winter to the PlayStation network

http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/tv/2014/09/16/powers-tv-exclusive-first-look/15712229/

Every PSN user in the US will receive the first episode of Powers for free and PlayStation Plus members will be able to view the entire season for free.

All volumes of the Eisner award-winning Powers series are available through Marvel/icon or digitally through comixology.  yum yum.

https://www.comixology.com/Powers-Vol-1/comics-series/4546

brianmichaelbendis:

In 1972 NASA launched the "Jupiter Plaque", an engraved tablet depicting life on Earth and our location in the cosmos, for any intelligent life that may come across it.
The Los Angles Times asked several prominent artists to draw what they would have put on the plaque and why. To the surprise of everyone, Kirby the futurist and visionary drew two superbeings, a man and a woman, that would scare away potential conquerors. Suggesting to intelligent life that everyone on Earth are Supermen. This was his explanation:
"I see no wisdom in the eagerness to be found and approached by any intelligence with the ability to accomplish it from any sector of space. In the meetings between ‘discoverers’ and ‘discoverees’, history has always given the advantage to the finders. In the case of the Jupiter Plaque, I feel that a tremendous issue was thoughtlessly taken out of the world forum by a few individuals who have marked a clear trail to our door. My point is who will come-a-knocking, the trader or the tiger?"
JUPITER PLAQUE SUGGESTION (1972)By Jack Kirby (pencils/colors) & Mike Royer (inks)

brianmichaelbendis:

In 1972 NASA launched the "Jupiter Plaque", an engraved tablet depicting life on Earth and our location in the cosmos, for any intelligent life that may come across it.

The Los Angles Times asked several prominent artists to draw what they would have put on the plaque and why. To the surprise of everyone, Kirby the futurist and visionary drew two superbeings, a man and a woman, that would scare away potential conquerors. Suggesting to intelligent life that everyone on Earth are Supermen.

This was his explanation:

"I see no wisdom in the eagerness to be found and approached by any intelligence with the ability to accomplish it from any sector of space. In the meetings between ‘discoverers’ and ‘discoverees’, history has always given the advantage to the finders. In the case of the Jupiter Plaque, I feel that a tremendous issue was thoughtlessly taken out of the world forum by a few individuals who have marked a clear trail to our door. My point is who will come-a-knocking, the trader or the tiger?"

JUPITER PLAQUE SUGGESTION (1972)
By Jack Kirby (pencils/colors) & Mike Royer (inks)

(Source: thecomicsvault)

thetinhouse:

Kurt always says it best.

Kurt Vonnegut: 16 Rules For Writing Fiction
1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.
2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.
3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.
4. Every sentence must do one of two things — reveal character or advance the action.
5. Start as close to the end as possible.
6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them — in order that the reader may see what they are made of.
7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.
8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.
9. Find a subject you care aboutand which you in your heart feel others should care about.
10. Do not ramble.
11. Keep it simple. Simplicity of language is not only reputable, but perhaps even sacred.
12. Have guts to cut. Your rule might be this: If a sentence, no matter how excellent, does not illuminate your subject in some new and useful way, scratch it out.
13. Sound like yourself. The writing style which is most natural for you is bound to echo the speech you heard when a child.
14. Say what you mean. You should avoid Picasso-style or jazz-style writing, if you have something worth saying and wish to be understood.
15. Pity the readers. Our stylistic options as writers are neither numerous nor glamorous, since our readers are bound to be such imperfect artists.
16. You choose. The most meaningful aspect of our styles, which is what we choose to write about, is utterly unlimited.

thetinhouse:

Kurt always says it best.

Kurt Vonnegut: 16 Rules For Writing Fiction

1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.

2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.

3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.

4. Every sentence must do one of two things — reveal character or advance the action.

5. Start as close to the end as possible.

6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them — in order that the reader may see what they are made of.

7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.

8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.

9. Find a subject you care aboutand which you in your heart feel others should care about.

10. Do not ramble.

11. Keep it simple. Simplicity of language is not only reputable, but perhaps even sacred.

12. Have guts to cut. Your rule might be this: If a sentence, no matter how excellent, does not illuminate your subject in some new and useful way, scratch it out.

13. Sound like yourself. The writing style which is most natural for you is bound to echo the speech you heard when a child.

14. Say what you mean. You should avoid Picasso-style or jazz-style writing, if you have something worth saying and wish to be understood.

15. Pity the readers. Our stylistic options as writers are neither numerous nor glamorous, since our readers are bound to be such imperfect artists.

16. You choose. The most meaningful aspect of our styles, which is what we choose to write about, is utterly unlimited.

(Source: mimswriter, via joehillsthrills)

As Arnold points out, there is an otherwise inexplicable shift in direction in the Piccadilly line passing east out of South Kensington. “In fact,” she writes, “the tunnel curves between Knightsbridge and South Kensington stations because it was impossible to drill through the mass of skeletal remains buried in Hyde Park.” I will admit that I think she means “between Knightsbridge and Hyde Park Corner”—although there is apparently a “small plague pit dating from around 1664” beneath Knightsbridge Green—but I will defer to Arnold’s research.

But to put that another way, the ground was so solidly packed with the interlocked skeletons of 17th-century victims of the Great Plague that the Tube’s 19th-century excavation teams couldn’t even hack their way through them all. The Tube thus had to swerve to the side along a subterranean detour in order to avoid this huge congested knot of skulls, ribs, legs, and arms tangled in the soil—an artificial geology made of people, caught in the throat of greater London.

London and Its Dead

i read shit like this and think what could my imagination possibly have to add

like how do i write something about london that’s weirder than london already is?

(via weunderstandthelights)

the dead speak. and they are powerful.

(via hungryghoast)

In Dracula the Unconquered, there was eventually going to be a BIG confrontation with an end-boss type villain in the Sedlec Ossuary, but man, this would’ve been such a better setting.

(via twentypercentcooler)

(Source: saxifraga-x-urbium, via twentypercentcooler)